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Hypoperfusion of the cerebral white matter in multiple sclerosis: possible mechanisms and pathophysiological significance

(2008) De Keyser, J.; Steen, C.; Mostert, J.P.; Koch, M.W.

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease of the central nervous system characterized by patchy areas of demyelination, inflammation, axonal loss and gliosis, and a diffuse axonal degeneration throughout the so-called normal-appearing white matter (NAWM). A number of recent studies using perfusion magnetic resonance imaging in both relapsing and progressive forms of MS have shown a decreased perfusion of the NAWM, which does not appear to be secondary to axonal loss. The reduced perfusion of the NAWM in MS might be caused by a widespread astrocyte dysfunction, possibly related to a deficiency in astrocytic beta(2)-adrenergic receptors and a reduced formation of cAMP, resulting in a reduced uptake of K+ at the nodes of Ranvier and a reduced release of K+ in the perivascular spaces. Pathologic and imaging studies suggest that ischemic changes might be involved in the development of a subtype of focal demyelinating lesions (type III lesions), and there appears to exist a relationship between decreased white matter perfusion and cognitive dysfunction in patients with MS




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ID 19576
Mother ID 19300
Order De Keyser, J.; Hypoperfusion of the cerebral white matter in multiple sclerosis: possible mechanisms and pathophysiological significance
Name Hypoofthc
Publish yes
OAI name Article
Path root/2008/Hypoofthc/
Short title NL Hypoofthc
Short title EN Hypoofthc
Created on: 2010-01-14 12:54:27
Last modified: 2010-01-14 12:54:27
Digital ID 4b4f14032d044
Journall JOURNAL OF CEREBRAL BLOOD FLOW AND METABOLISM
Volume number 28
Series number 10
Title Hypoperfusion of the cerebral white matter in multiple sclerosis: possible mechanisms and pathophysiological significance
Title order Hypoperfusion of the cerebral white matter in multiple sclerosis: possible mechanisms and pathophysiological significance
Exchangeable no
Printing on demand no
Page start 1645
Page end 1651
Year issued 2008
Language en_US
Type Article / Letter to editor
Description Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease of the central nervous system characterized by patchy areas of demyelination, inflammation, axonal loss and gliosis, and a diffuse axonal degeneration throughout the so-called normal-appearing white matter (NAWM). A number of recent studies using perfusion magnetic resonance imaging in both relapsing and progressive forms of MS have shown a decreased perfusion of the NAWM, which does not appear to be secondary to axonal loss. The reduced perfusion of the NAWM in MS might be caused by a widespread astrocyte dysfunction, possibly related to a deficiency in astrocytic beta(2)-adrenergic receptors and a reduced formation of cAMP, resulting in a reduced uptake of K+ at the nodes of Ranvier and a reduced release of K+ in the perivascular spaces. Pathologic and imaging studies suggest that ischemic changes might be involved in the development of a subtype of focal demyelinating lesions (type III lesions), and there appears to exist a relationship between decreased white matter perfusion and cognitive dysfunction in patients with MS
Rights UMCG
ISI number ISI:000259445100001
Departments NEU
ISSN 0271-678X
Keywords astrocyte; axonal loss; Belgium; BLOOD-FLOW; BETA(2)-ADRENERGIC RECEPTORS; HEMODYNAMIC IMPAIRMENT; DIFFUSION TENSOR; PERFUSION MRI; K+ CHANNELS; BRAIN; ASTROCYTES; LESIONS; RAT; central nervous system; demyelination; development; DISEASE; gliosis; imaging; inflammation; MECHANISMS; multiple sclerosis; multiple sclerosis; cerebral blood flow; normal-appearing white matter; astrocytes; white matter ischemia; Netherlands; patient; perfusion; receptor; review; white matter
Keyword UMCG Endocrinology & Metabolism; Hematology; Neurosciences
Author(s) De Keyser, J.; Steen, C.; Mostert, J.P.; Koch, M.W.


 
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